Classic movie site with rare images (no web grabs!), original ads, and behind-the-scenes photos, with informative and insightful commentary. We like to have fun with movies!
Archive and Links
grbrpix@aol.com
Search Index Here




Monday, February 13, 2006




More On Carole Lombard



A few years back, a good friend and Lombard historian told me the incredible story of an aviation buff who'd located and examined the wreckage of Carole Lombard's plane, the one on which she and 21 other passengers died that fateful evening of January 16, 1942. Just getting to this site is an incredible ordeal. First there's a jeep ride over rocky terrain, then the hike on foot, which takes hours, they say. The mountain peak they hit that night was 8000 ft. high, so you can imagine the effort of reaching it. Over the last sixty plus years, a number of scavengers have made the trek, and the incredible thing is, they’re still finding artifacts from the crash, including personal effects. One scavenger actually discovered a piece of Lombard’s jewelry with her monogram --- and this was within the last ten years! There's a plane engine embedded yet in a rock wall on the mountain's face. Pieces of the landing gear are still there. The only reason they haven’t been carried out is because they’re too heavy and unwieldy. Smaller pieces of the wreck have been hauled down and sold on ebay. Maybe you’ve seen the listings now and then. There’s something morbidly fascinating about a hobby like that, or maybe it’s just plain morbid. According to various websites (HERE’S the most detailed one), there are folks who travel from one plane crash site to another, just looking for clues as to how and why. The Lombard mountain is a rite of passage for these air disaster enthusiasts. My girlfriend thinks that owning such artifacts would be ill-advised, that to do so might bring evil tidings, and result in a haunted house. Indeed, it may be unwise to disturb those restless spirits up on that mountain, and to sell recovered articles from such hallowed ground (on ebay, yet!) would seem to invite disaster. All I can say to the prospect of making that trip is --- include me out


Nothing’s harder than selecting the best of these glamour shots for our Monday postings. For Carole Lombard, I wanted to include a few striking pre-code images along with the later stuff, so here she is in some early 30’s publicity poses. That set grouping is for The Princess Comes Across, a 1936 comedy with Fred MacMurray, seen with her here. I assume that's director William K. Howard in the chair, although there's no caption to confirm it. I couldn’t resist one of those gorgeous rotogravures (the one on the bed) from a typical Sunday newspaper section of the day. Each week, subscribers could depend on at least one beautiful color image of a favorite star. Fortunately, a lot of readers saved them. Finally, there’s a color image from a Paramount exhibitor’s annual heralding the 1934-35 season, wherein Carole was announced for another teaming with Gary Cooper in Twenty Hours By Air, an intriguing project for the two which was subsequently cancelled.

2 Comments:

Anonymous Anonymous said...

More Carol glamour shots please!!!

12:47 PM  
Anonymous Robert Keser said...

Paramount apparently downsized TWENTY HOURS BY AIR into THIRTEEN HOURS BY AIR in 1936, which starred Joan Bennett and Fred MacMurray.

Fascinating stuff about Lombard's crash site, though!

9:09 AM  

Post a Comment

<< Home

grbrpix@aol.com
  • December 2005
  • January 2006
  • February 2006
  • March 2006
  • April 2006
  • May 2006
  • June 2006
  • July 2006
  • August 2006
  • September 2006
  • October 2006
  • November 2006
  • December 2006
  • January 2007
  • February 2007
  • March 2007
  • April 2007
  • May 2007
  • June 2007
  • July 2007
  • August 2007
  • September 2007
  • October 2007
  • November 2007
  • December 2007
  • January 2008
  • February 2008
  • March 2008
  • April 2008
  • May 2008
  • June 2008
  • July 2008
  • August 2008
  • September 2008
  • October 2008
  • November 2008
  • December 2008
  • January 2009
  • February 2009
  • March 2009
  • April 2009
  • May 2009
  • June 2009
  • July 2009
  • August 2009
  • September 2009
  • October 2009
  • November 2009
  • December 2009
  • January 2010
  • February 2010
  • March 2010
  • April 2010
  • May 2010
  • June 2010
  • July 2010
  • August 2010
  • September 2010
  • October 2010
  • November 2010
  • December 2010
  • January 2011
  • February 2011
  • March 2011
  • April 2011
  • May 2011
  • June 2011
  • July 2011
  • August 2011
  • September 2011
  • October 2011
  • November 2011
  • December 2011
  • January 2012
  • February 2012
  • March 2012
  • April 2012
  • May 2012
  • June 2012
  • July 2012
  • August 2012
  • September 2012
  • October 2012
  • November 2012
  • December 2012
  • January 2013
  • February 2013
  • March 2013
  • April 2013
  • May 2013
  • June 2013
  • July 2013
  • August 2013
  • September 2013
  • October 2013
  • November 2013
  • December 2013
  • January 2014
  • February 2014
  • March 2014
  • April 2014
  • May 2014
  • June 2014
  • July 2014
  • August 2014
  • September 2014
  • October 2014
  • November 2014